No Picture
News

New principal for MPS

Children at Morrisburg Public School (MPS) will be seeing a new face in the hallways and around the schoolyard this year.

Beverley Bethune, MPS’s new principal, is making the 75km commute from South Lancaster, a town east of Cornwall.

The new principal at MPS brings a strong background in special education as well as in steering a school in a positive direction.

In 1975, Bethune received a Bachelor of Physical Education as well as a Bachelor of Arts in Geography, both from McMaster.

Bethune received her Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Ottawa in 1992, qualifying her to teach intermediate and secondary in the areas of physical education and geography.

Bethune added computers and special education to her teaching credentials in the 1990’s. Qualifications for junior division were added in 2005.

Also in 2005 Bethune also began  working to complete the requirements to become an Ontario school principal. This she achieved in 2006.

The position with MPS is Bethune’s first time serving as principal. To back her in her new position she brings extensive  experience as a vice-principal.

Bethune comes directly to MPS from her position as Vice-Principal of T. R. Leger’s Eastern Region where she worked with at risk students.

Prior to that Bethune served as Vice-Principal at Rothwell Osnabruck K-13 School in Ingleside.

Her first stint as a vice-principal lasted for five years at Cornwall’s General Vanier Intermediate School.

Before becoming a vice-principal, Bethune taught at General Vanier when it was a secondary school and continued to teach there when it became an Intermediate School in 2002.

Principal Bethune believes that  students are “all teachable” and she wants to see “that each individual student reach their own potential.”

In terms of plans for the school, Principal Bethune said that her “focus is [on] student learning.”

She went on to say that her “passion in education is the at risk student.”

When asked what she’d like to say to readers of the Leader, Bethune said that she is a “strong believer in community partnerships and community focus on schools.”

She ended the interview with an invitation to the community: “I welcome anyone who wants to volunteer.”

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No Picture
Opinion

Catastrophic drug costs

Imagine moving to Ontario from another province and finding out that the costs of your expensive prescription cancer medications aren’t covered in your new home. Even though the Canada Health Act provides for comparable levels of medical care from province to province, the same isn’t true when it comes to expensive life-saving medicines.

Many Canadian families still face catastrophic drug costs (defined as greater than three per cent of net household income), even in provinces where universal coverage exists.

Most provinces have catastrophic drug plans, but each has a different mechanism for determining which drugs are covered. The Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) is calling for the development of a national catastrophic drug insurance program to help create a consistent, coordinated approach to coverage across Canada. Joanne Di Nardo, senior manager of public issues for the Ontario division of the CCS, encourages Ontario voters to ask local candidates running in the upcoming provincial election about their level of support on cancer issues.

“A national catastrophic drug insurance program has been an election issue for many years,” says Di Nardo. “Ontario should take a leadership role in partnership with other provinces to encourage the federal government to establish a national catastrophic drug insurance program. Action is needed now to alleviate the gaps and disparities in coverage for cancer drugs that currently exist in Canada.”

There are no agreed-upon standards concerning which drugs should be covered or the out-of-pocket expense required from patients. Each of Canada’s 19 public drug plans, and a variety of private plans, make widely different decisions regarding listings, reimbursement, co-payments and lifetime limits. Therefore, significant disparities exist between provinces and between public and private insurers.

“These disparities result in a growing trend away from universal care towards health care by postal code and pocketbook,” says Di Nardo.

A system of catastrophic drug coverage was promised in the 2004 Health Accord, and, in September 2008, provincial and territorial health ministers issued a statement saying they held ‘a common view that catastrophic drug coverage is as essential to Canadians as physician and hospital coverage.’

“Ontarians are growing increasingly impatient that no action has been taken,” says Di Nardo. “Make sure your local provincial politician knows how you feel about this issue.”

For more information, go to www.cancer.ca/OntarioElection2011 

[…]

No Picture
Sports

Ottawa Hylands golfer wins soggy Cedar Glen Open

The main feature of the annual Labour Day Men’s Open tournament at the Cedar Glen course here Monday was soggy conditions.

But despite the heavy all night rain, the show must go on, and when it was all over it was Ottawa Hylands golfer, Paul Nooyen leading the field.

Nooyen posted a four-over-par 74 to lead the field of 86 golfers and narrowly edge out Morrisburg Golf Club’s Randy Casselman at 75. Finishing third was Cedar Glen’s Kurtis Barkley (76).

Only six golfers broke the 80 barrier on the day, the remaining three including Iroquois’ Shawn Lapier with a 79, Nationview’s Rodney Pitnam with a 79 and Morrisburg’s Kirk Barkley with a 79.

Lapier’s 79 gave him a 71 net for the low net in A flight, while Barkley’s 79 led the B field for the low gross.

The low net in B flight was won by Phil Douglas of Cedar Glen who shot an 83 for a net 70. Although tied with Bill Collins (Cedar Glen) who shot an 85 for a 70 net, he took the win when officials broke the tie.

In C flight, Steven Tupper, walked away the clear-cut winner with a 91. His next closest competition came from Jim Casselman with a 101. The low net in the flight went to Dennis Casselman who shot a 102 for a 76 net. Again the win required the breaking of a tie with Mike Berube also posting a 76 net score on his 102 round.

Other top scores in A flight were shot by Morrisburg’s Kevin Duvall with an 81, and Nationview’s Marc Ethier and Cedar Glen’s Lindsay Weegar who tied with 82s. Williamsburg’s Kyle Jarvis and Nationview’s Fabian Adams and Upper Canada’s Mike Lauring tied with 83s.

Following Kirk Barkley’s win in B flight were Cedar Glen golfers Phil Douglas 83 and Bill Collins 85, Rob Casselman 87 and Greg VanDellan 87.
 

[…]

No Picture
News

Extra, extra, read all about it: movie being filmed at UCV this September!

Upper Canada Village is opening its doors to Siloam Entertainment from September 10th to the 14th.

Brian Lutes, writer, director and actor, needs 150 to 200 extras for  his movie, Percy Harris.

According to Lutes, the movie, a period western, “is a film about a confederate soldier apprehended while returning home from the war and is convicted of a crime he didn’t commit. He’s sentenced to hang.”

“With several twists and turns (sort of a combination of Wizard of Oz meets Rambo), we follow Percy on his quest for freedom, struggling against bounty hunters, brutal terrain and a legion of inner demons.”

To view some of the scene captures, Lutes suggests going to the Facebook page for “Percy Harris the movie.”

So, what about those extras?

Lutes predicts that the biggest number of extras will be needed on Sunday the 11th and Monday the 12th. Shooting happens between 8:00 and 5:30.

“Unfortunately, wardrobe is in limited supply with that many extras… So, we’re asking people to go through their closets and bring the most “period” friendly clothing they have.”

“They could dress as a farmer, cowboy, or townspeople.”

If you are interested in being an extra, email Brian Lutes at blutes@storm.ca or Anik Rompre at nykkytta@gmail.com.

[…]