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Sports

Golf for WDMH

September 7, 2011 Editor

Over 300 area residents have chosen to support Winchester District Memorial Hospital by attending a What’s Your Story golf tournament in the past two months.
 
“The program has truly taken off,” says WDMH Foundation Board Chair, Diane Crummy. “We’re so inspired by the level of dedication and commitment that the hospital’s catchment area has already shown in regards to the What’s Your Story fund raising program.”

What’s Your Story is a program that encourages those with a passion for WDMH to share that passion by organizing a fund raising event. Since its inception, 12 area residents have planned and executed a community fund raiser.

With the beautiful weather, golf tournaments have been one of the more popular What’s Your Story event options!

On July 8, Cloverdale Links hosted a tournament, and raised over $2,000! Shortly thereafter, Cedar Glen played host to the Trevor Barkley Memorial Tournament, and the Russell House Pub Charity Golf Tournament.  The Trevor Barkley Memorial Golf Tournament has been taking place since 2000, and has raised more than $68,000 in that time.

Both Denis Casselman and Gib Patterson have continued to be supportive of these community fund raising golf tournaments, and their support is much appreciated.

Most recently, Lucky 7 Bar & Grill in Embrun organized their 12th annual charity golf tournament at Casselview Golf & Country Club.  The proceeds have been designated to the WDMH Foundation for the past several years, raising over $9,000.

There are also two upcoming golf tournaments to benefit the WDMH Foundation, including one on September 10 at Cedar Glen Golf Course, and another on September 24 at Cloverdale Links Golf Course.

To inquire about attending either of these events, or for more information on organizing a communityfundraising event, please contact the Foundation Office at 613-774-2420 x.6164.

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News

Church mural gets facelift

September 7, 2011 Editor

It’s hard to drive down County Road #2 through Riverside Heights and not see the grand artwork that is the Church Mural.

The mural is just one of 17 erected between 2001 and 2005. The murals were created “to illustrate South Dundas’s rich heritage and culture.”

The Church Mural, originally created by Mike Kelly in 2003, is a compilation of local churches, past and present.

In 2009, the South Dundas Mural Committee came together in response to the dismantling of the Iroquois Point Mural. The committee’s purpose is to restore murals if necessary and if possible.

According to Jane Cox, spokesperson for South Dundas Murals, “Last year we did lose one mural but by using reserved mural funds, five murals were restored leaving us with 12 that needed some help.”

She went on to say that, “The amount of money needed for immediate art restoration of some of the pieces exceeded the amount budgeted by our local municipality. A community group came  forward in hopes of maintaining these works of art, thus champions of a mural was born.”

Champions are people or groups who are willing to financially back the restoration. This includes artist fees and supplies.

The  South Williamsburg Township Recreation Association (SWTRA) is the original champion of the Church Mural, lobbying for its initial construction. This group is once again lobbying for the mural, but this time for its survival.

Keith and Linda Robinson, members of the SWTRA, reported that it has taken three years of fundraising to secure the funds required for the restoration. Keith estimates that the restoration of the mural will be about $4,500. The final tally will come when the project is complete.

While the Robinson’s and the SWTRA are providing the funds for the restoration project, the South Dundas Mural Committee has been responsible for finding an artist willing to do the restoration.

Here enters John Ellenberger to lend his talent. Ellenberger was the original artist for two of the South Dundas murals. The Memorial Mural for the Iroquois Legion and the History of Agriculture Mural for the Williamsburg IOOF Hall were both completed by Ellenberger in 2003.

When asked why he decided to restore the Church Mural, Ellenberger replied with a smile, “someone’s gotta do it.”

While discussing the work to be done Ellenberger gave credit to Kelly’s use of automotive paints when doing the original. He believes that this is why the mural has “held up pretty good” since its creation.

Ellenberger will be using water-based paints to restore the painting, but promises the changes will flow seamlessly with the original.

While Ellenberger will need to do work on the mural at its location on County Road #2, he has taken down two pieces from the lower  right side of the mural.

He is working diligently on redoing these two sections completely as they were the most affected by water damage. Ellenberger is working out of the Robinson’s garage at their home in Riverside Heights.

When asked how they plan to protect the mural going forward, the Robinson’s reported that they will be building a roof over the mural that covers the front and back. The SWTRA is also providing the funds for this part of the project.

As for Ellenberger, he estimates that the work left to do will take just over a week to complete. He will then be driving back to his home in Alberta where he has additional jobs to complete.

In addition to murals, Ellenberger also uses his talent for motorcycles, trucks, cars, helmets, and portraits.

The Church Mural is not the only one with a champion. The New Canadians Mural is being championed by the Kolff Family. The Health Spa Mural is being championed by Mary Steele. The Caldwell Mural is being championed by Magnus Restoration of Iroquois. The WWII Homecoming Mural may have a new champion as well!

According to Cox, the “McIntosh Country Inn & Conference Centre will champion the McIntosh Apple [mural] and, with weather permitting, restoration may start next week.”

Unfortunately, not all the murals can be saved. The Aerial View of Morrisburg Mural is one of those “being allowed to age gracefully” and eventually taken down.

Cox reports that “hard decisions remain for our two remaining murals ‘North Side-Main Street’ on the west side of Giant Tiger and ‘South Side-Main Street’ on Upper Canada Playhouse.”

When asked if there were plans to create new murals, Cox said “There are not any plans for this group to initiate new murals but with the completed restoration and maintenance it does give our community an additional five year window to enjoy this collection.”

“We recognize these murals are not going to be with us forever but until something else comes forward let’s use these pieces of art to showcase our area.”

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No Picture
Sports

Local seniors on the podium

September 7, 2011 Editor

A number of local athletes stepped to the podium at the first-ever Eastern Regional Summer Senior Games that attracted 319 participants to Smiths Falls, August 23.

Participants representing the local District 8 which includes Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry, Prescott, Russell and Akwesasne brought home a number of medals in bridge, euchre, golf, cribbage, darts and horseshoes.

Leading the way were Jim and Judy Scott of Morrisburg who claimed the gold medal in darts.

Rene and Rheal Giroux added a gold in horseshoes and Hilda Bouvier and Marlene Neal, a gold in cribbage.

On the links, golfers from South Dundas gave a good showing.

Elise Muir (who plays out of Cedar Glen) won the golf medal in B flight and Joan Findlay (also Cedar Glen) backed her with a bronze. Nancy Warner claimed the silver in A flight, while Monique Patenaude (who plays out of the Morrisburg Golf Club) won bronze. In the Callaway category, Barbara Phifer (Cedar Glen) won silver.

In men’s action, Donald McMillan was third in B flight, and Dale Swerdfeger won the Callaway division.

Pat Durin and Mary McDonald picked up bronze in contract bridge and Clifford Duquette and John Cadieux teamed for a silver medal in euchre.

District 8 will host the Eastern Regional Summer Games in 2013.

The senior games are run seasonally as winter and summer events, and every second year (alternately between the two) qualifiers lead to activities at the provincial and federal levels.

Next year’s summer qualifiers will lead to play at the Ontario 55 plus 2012 Summer Games to be hosted by Brampton in August and the Canadian 55 plus Summer Games in Sydney, Nova Scotia, August 29-September 1st.

[…]

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News

Will SD&SG’s next MPP be from the Libertarian Party?

September 7, 2011 Editor

Darcy Neal Donnelly of Fournier, Ontario has added his name to the ballot to become Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry’s next MPP.

Donnelly, a member of the Libertarian Party, believes that voters are not being given enough freedom in terms of money, taxes, and politics.

On the topic of money, Donnelly had this to say: “please note that within our MONETARY POLICY, We would grant individuals and corporations the freedom to issue their own currencies. Your money would compete (in a free market) with Canadian Tire money or with Bitcoin or with Canadian government loonies.”

He continued by asking, “Now how would that affect our average voters, non-voters and small towns within our community?”

Donnelly then answered his own question: “They will experience greater economic freedom and have the ability to reduce poverty. Since I have been voting; We get the same policies. We get more and more government regulations, rules and taxes.”

“Businesses are forced to be TAX Collectors. Business is leaving for less fascist government controls. Jobs are disappearing. Poverty is increasing.”

“People who want to reduce poverty believe that government controls are the solutions. Take a look at the government results. Fascist regulations. Endless deficits and growing debts. Countries going bankrupt. Poverty rising everywhere. People revolting. We want another option.”

This is where the Libertarian Party enters the picture. Donnelly claims, “We are offering [voters] another choice. We are the Party of Choice. Our vision is communities  of freedom, harmony and abundance.”

[…]

No Picture
Sports

Lions skating into a busy pre-season

September 7, 2011 Editor

The Morrisburg Junior B Lions have hit the ice for their 2011/12 tryouts, and coach Thom Racine, back for his second season at the helm, says he like what he sees, although he has lost a couple of key players that will be tough to replace.

“We have a lot of kids at camp, and we have a real good nucleus of players returning,” says Racine.

“Unfortunately, Mitch Lefebvre, our go to guy, is skating with a Triple A Junior team in Quebec and defenceman Patrick Cyr is in the Cumberland camp (Central Junior).”

“We have 12 others who are back, and we are optimistic about some of the young local talent we are seeing.”

The Lions had their first ice time at the Benson Centre in Cornwall on the weekend of August 27-28. Racine said he ran scrimmages during each of the two, two-hour sessions.

This past weekend the Lions embarked on a schedule that will see them play six games in eight days, as Raccine and his coaching staff, which currently includes Cody Casselman and Jarett Racine, ready the team for their opening game on Friday night, September 16 in Kemptville.

All but two of the pre-season exhibition games will be played in Maxville.

Racine does not expect to skate on home ice until Tuesday, September 13 which will be a practise as the Lions prepare for their opening game to be played at the Eastern Ontario Junior Hockey League’s Showcase event in Kemptville.

“We’ll be playing the Ottawa West Golden Knights,” says Racine with a chuckle adding, “thanks for coming out” as his description of what he expects will be a tough opener against the Knights who are perennial leaders in the Metro Division of the league.

Local skaters (still midget age) at the  Lions opening camp included centreman Marc Beckstead and defenceman Ty Hodgson and Racine is impressed with both.

The two were drafted in May in the Central Hockey League Bantam and Midget-aged Draft (Tier II Junior A).

Beckstead, who played in the Upper Canada Cyclones organization last season, was drafted second overall by the Cumberland Grads and is currently skating at their camp.

Hodgson who played for the St. Lawrence Kings last season was selected in the ninth round of the draft by the Brockville Braves.

While Racine says he is looking at some really talented young players, he is pleased to have goaltender Mikael Dion back. “He’s the kid who carried us into the playoffs last year.”

Racine expects to have his numbers down by the Lions first practise on home ice on the 13th, in order to have a team ready for the opener in Kemptville.

By that time he expects it will be clearer about what is happening with the players who are still skating at Junior A camps.

The Eastern Ontario Junior Hockey League’s Fall Classic will run three days, September 16-18, at Kemptville. Local hockey fans can purchase passes for $25 to take in all of the games which will run on both sheets of ice at the Kemptville complex. Tickets are set at $10 per day.

The Lions kick off their season against the Golden nights at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, night September 16 in Rink B. Another three games will be played Friday night and action resumes Saturday morning at 10 a.m. with the Akwesasne Wolves playing the Almonte Thunder. The Lions will play their second game of the weekend Saturday night at 8 p.m. against Stittsville.

This is the only time during the regular season that teams in the North and South Divisions of the Eastern Ontario Junior Hockey League will meet. The overall EOJHL championship is played between the north and south.

[…]

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News

Green Party joins race for SD&SG’s next MPP

September 7, 2011 Editor

Justin Reist, a Toronto area native entering his third year at Carleton University, is hoping to become Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry’s next MPP.

Reist is joining the race as a member of the Green Party and has chosen this riding because of its close proximity to the Ottawa campus as well as its need for a Green Party candidate.

While Reist will be busy with school, he maintains that he will still be available to the people of his riding via e-mail, Facebook, or Twitter.

Reist is currently pursuing an Honours degree in Political Science with a minor in Communications.

In a recent e-mail interview, Reist was questioned about his priorities and how they will affect the small towns and communities of SD&SG.

In reply, Reist revealed: “I think my priorities and those of the Green Party of Ontario are ones shared by most Ontarians.”

“I am deeply committed to improving standards of living for all residents in Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry in a way that is economically and environmentally sound. I should clarify what I mean when I say the environment is a priority for me.”

“In developing our environmental policies, the Green Party doesn’t just look at traditional environmentalism. We look further than the simple or immediate solution, and work to lessen our environmental impact in a way that boosts the economy and improves residents’ standards of living.”

“By investing in green technology and shifting to a less carbon-intensive economy, we create jobs not just for the next three years, but jobs that will be around for the next 15 or 30 years and contribute to healthy communities.”

Reist had the following to say about SD&SG’s voter priorities: “I believe residents of Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry are focused on job creation, improving our health care system, and keeping their communities healthy and vibrant for years to come.”

“I am very much committed to addressing the needs of residents of my riding, and I’m looking forward to speaking with them and finding other areas where I can represent their needs.”

Reinforcing his commitment, he said, “I can really be the voice for the people in my riding. Above all, that is any MPP’s job, and one that I aspire to.”

Finally, Reist, who is 19 years old, addressed the issue of whether voters might think he was too young to be an MPP: “To those voters that may say I’m too young, and I’m sure there are many who think that, I would say that being young is one of the greatest assets I bring to the table.”

“My age gives me a different approach to politics – one that is based on sound policy rather than entrenched ideological views. It gives me the flexibility to learn and grow in this position, and makes me more open to other voices.”

“Even more importantly, being this young means I have much more invested in the future than those older than me. Every issue this province is facing right now is one I will be facing for twice as long.”

In conclusion, “I feel a great sense of duty in making sure that Ontario and Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry have a sound economic and environmental future for myself and the generations after me.”

Will readers vote Green Party on October 6th? We will have to wait and see.

[…]

No Picture
Opinion

Around the Township…

September 7, 2011 Editor

September has arrived, our youth returned to the classrooms yesterday, (Tuesday) and we are just under three weeks away from the big ‘South Dundas Community Playground’ build set for Saturday, September 24. The project has resulted in massive community support through all sorts of fund raising from big to little events. Coming up this Saturday, September 10, a ‘fun’ sounding event will take place at the Canadian Tire. For the Playground fund raiser, Tribec Inflatables will bring ALL his inflatables and assemble them on the one-acre grassed area near the Morrisburg Water Tower, weather permitting. Canadian Tire owner Michel Proulx is inviting the entire community to head on over to the Canadian Tire this Saturday, for all the fun which will include, in addition to the inflatables, a barbecue and other fun items. As everyone is aware the Playground will be built on September 24 in the southwest corner of the Earl Baker Park in Morrisburg. Site preparations will begin the week prior to the building day which is expected to include up to 200 community, volunteers in the build which will have the playground ready for the kids by 3 p.m. that same day. In a story that ran in last week’s issue of The Leader, the playground committee reported that $98,000 cash and in-kind donations had been raised for the community portion of project.

Also coming up in the not too distant future is the annual South Dundas Terry Fox Run that takes place in Morrisburg on Sunday, September 18 from the Morrisburg Legion (8 a.m. until noon). Pledge sheets for this year’s run can be obtained at the Morrisburg Legion. The Terry Fox Foundation is one of the largest non-governmental funders of cancer research in Canada. This year’s run honors Terry’s mother Betty Fox for her commitment to the cause, for her dedication, for her compassion, for her vision and for persevering at all cost. Betty Fox passed away on June 17, 2011.

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No Picture
Sports

Local riders to compete at provincial level

September 7, 2011 Editor

Four area riders are excited to be saddling up and heading off to the Caledon Equestrian Park at Palgrave, Ontario this week where they will compete from Thursday, September 8 to Sunday, September 11 in the Trillium Championships.

The four, Rayanna Marcellus (Pigeon Island Road resident), Courtney Casselman (Morrisburg), Julie Julien (Cornwall) and Josee Marleau Vallieres (Cornwall) all ride out of the fledgling Sarabeau Stable owned and operated by Sandy Marcellus.

With her stable having less than one year under its belt, Marcellus says that she and trainer Cheryl Levere are thrilled to have four of their riders qualify for the Ontario Championship.

Courtney Casselman, who is heading into Grade 8 at Seaway, is experiencing her first year of riding competitively. She will compete with Piccolini (Picco) in the large pony division.

Rayanna Marcellus, now in her third year of competitive riding, will ride Short Notice in the Small Pony category, Sweet Cherry Wine in Medium and Picco in B Equitation.

Sweet Cherry Wine and Picco are both owned by Sarabeau Stable.

The more experienced rider of the quartet, Julie Julien is from Cornwall and has been riding since she was four years old. This is Julie’s second trip to the championships, the first riding her own horse Palakari. She is riding in the Adult Amateur category.

Seventeen-year-old Josee of Cornwall has been riding competitively for seven years and she will ride Sentimental Journey (barn name Coco) for the championship.

Although Sandy’s daughter Rayanna started in the sport in the Quebec circuit, they switched to the Ontario when they established Sarabeau Stable.

“It’s a bigger circuit and covers all of Ontario which is divided into seven zones,” says Marcellus. “The seven top riders from each of the seven zones will compete in each of the divisions in the championship.”

“In the Quebec Zone, only the top four qualifying horses go to the championship.”

Riders qualify for the championships by accumulating points in zone shows. Sarabeau Stables could have rode in either the Ottawa Zone or the Eastern Zone, but chose the Eastern zone which had fewer shows.

The fewer shows kept the costs down, and also freed up more weekends for other Sarabeau riders to compete at local fairs.

Courtney finished second overall in the Eastern Zone with Picco in Large Hunter to qualify while Raynanna was second overall on Sweet Cherry Wine in Small Pony and sixth with Short Notice in Medium pony. She was first on Picco in B Equitation over fences and 5th in B Equitation on flat.

Julie on Palakari was sixth in Adult Amateur Hunter, third in Adult Equitation over field and sixth in Adult Equitation on Flat.

Josee and Coco were fourth in Children’s hunter, second in A Equitation over Fences and fourth in A Equitation Flat.

A is riders 16-18 years, B is 13-16 years and C is up to 12 years. In Equitation, the rider, rather than the horse is being judged.

“For our first year of being open, having four riders go to the championship is really good,” said Marcellus. “There are a lot of barns out there.”

“We have 10-15 riders out every week which is a good number for a first year stable,” says trainer Cheryl Levere. “Every year you generally grow and expand but you don’t want to get really big as you lose the fun.”

“And we are trying to keep it fun and enjoyable. We want our riders to understand what the horses are all about. It’s not just about competition.”

“I am here most weeks, seven days a week and the show kids are here probably five or six days a week.”

“To compete it takes work,” says Levere. “They are out here riding to improve everyday.”

Levere explains that “we want the riders to help with the chores. It’s just not to get on a horse, ride it and then go away.”

Each visit includes about 30 minutes on the horse and 60-90 minutes to care for the horse (brush, tack etc.)

Not only do the kids learn to ride, but they learn responsibility and benefit from the exercise. “You use every muscle in your body when riding.”

Levere expects that the four Sarabeau riders and their horses should do well this weekend.

Picco in his second year of competitive riding, “has improved over the last year. He’s learned how to relax, and how to take care of somebody.”

“This is Sweet Cherry Wine’s first year showing a full curcuit, and she’s holding her own.

Coco is in her first competitive year and PalaKari is coming off an injury.”

In addition to the success of the four competitive riders, Marcellus is pleased with how well “our Fair Team has done” in Williamstown and Avonmore.

The fair team includes Jeana Lamothe, 13, of Ingleside, Steph Quosdorf, 16, of Cornwall, Troy Webb, 14, of Ingleside and Bryanna.

“It’s all gone well,” says Marcellus of her longtime dream to own a riding stable. “I couldn’t be happier. I couldn’t have asked for a better group of kids and the horses and ponies here are all so quiet.”

“Last fall we started out that we were going to establish a horse/pony club, and here we are.”

Our barn slogan is Dream, Believe, Achieve.

Sarabeau Stable will to run clinics throughout the year and will accept new riders at any time.

“It would be nice to have 30 riders, but you have to start somewhere,” says Marcellus.

For more information call Sandy at  613-543-4561.

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News

New principal for MPS

September 7, 2011 Editor

Children at Morrisburg Public School (MPS) will be seeing a new face in the hallways and around the schoolyard this year.

Beverley Bethune, MPS’s new principal, is making the 75km commute from South Lancaster, a town east of Cornwall.

The new principal at MPS brings a strong background in special education as well as in steering a school in a positive direction.

In 1975, Bethune received a Bachelor of Physical Education as well as a Bachelor of Arts in Geography, both from McMaster.

Bethune received her Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Ottawa in 1992, qualifying her to teach intermediate and secondary in the areas of physical education and geography.

Bethune added computers and special education to her teaching credentials in the 1990’s. Qualifications for junior division were added in 2005.

Also in 2005 Bethune also began  working to complete the requirements to become an Ontario school principal. This she achieved in 2006.

The position with MPS is Bethune’s first time serving as principal. To back her in her new position she brings extensive  experience as a vice-principal.

Bethune comes directly to MPS from her position as Vice-Principal of T. R. Leger’s Eastern Region where she worked with at risk students.

Prior to that Bethune served as Vice-Principal at Rothwell Osnabruck K-13 School in Ingleside.

Her first stint as a vice-principal lasted for five years at Cornwall’s General Vanier Intermediate School.

Before becoming a vice-principal, Bethune taught at General Vanier when it was a secondary school and continued to teach there when it became an Intermediate School in 2002.

Principal Bethune believes that  students are “all teachable” and she wants to see “that each individual student reach their own potential.”

In terms of plans for the school, Principal Bethune said that her “focus is [on] student learning.”

She went on to say that her “passion in education is the at risk student.”

When asked what she’d like to say to readers of the Leader, Bethune said that she is a “strong believer in community partnerships and community focus on schools.”

She ended the interview with an invitation to the community: “I welcome anyone who wants to volunteer.”

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No Picture
Opinion

Catastrophic drug costs

September 7, 2011 Editor

Imagine moving to Ontario from another province and finding out that the costs of your expensive prescription cancer medications aren’t covered in your new home. Even though the Canada Health Act provides for comparable levels of medical care from province to province, the same isn’t true when it comes to expensive life-saving medicines.

Many Canadian families still face catastrophic drug costs (defined as greater than three per cent of net household income), even in provinces where universal coverage exists.

Most provinces have catastrophic drug plans, but each has a different mechanism for determining which drugs are covered. The Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) is calling for the development of a national catastrophic drug insurance program to help create a consistent, coordinated approach to coverage across Canada. Joanne Di Nardo, senior manager of public issues for the Ontario division of the CCS, encourages Ontario voters to ask local candidates running in the upcoming provincial election about their level of support on cancer issues.

“A national catastrophic drug insurance program has been an election issue for many years,” says Di Nardo. “Ontario should take a leadership role in partnership with other provinces to encourage the federal government to establish a national catastrophic drug insurance program. Action is needed now to alleviate the gaps and disparities in coverage for cancer drugs that currently exist in Canada.”

There are no agreed-upon standards concerning which drugs should be covered or the out-of-pocket expense required from patients. Each of Canada’s 19 public drug plans, and a variety of private plans, make widely different decisions regarding listings, reimbursement, co-payments and lifetime limits. Therefore, significant disparities exist between provinces and between public and private insurers.

“These disparities result in a growing trend away from universal care towards health care by postal code and pocketbook,” says Di Nardo.

A system of catastrophic drug coverage was promised in the 2004 Health Accord, and, in September 2008, provincial and territorial health ministers issued a statement saying they held ‘a common view that catastrophic drug coverage is as essential to Canadians as physician and hospital coverage.’

“Ontarians are growing increasingly impatient that no action has been taken,” says Di Nardo. “Make sure your local provincial politician knows how you feel about this issue.”

For more information, go to www.cancer.ca/OntarioElection2011 

[…]