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News

Strike Averted

October 5, 2011 Editor

The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation (SLSMC) announced early Monday (October 3) that it had reached a tentative collective agreement with the Canadian Auto Workers which represents the Corporation’s 475 unionized employees.

The agreement, which was reached following bargaining which extended through the weekend, is subject to ratification by the union membership.

Details of the agreement will not be released pending ratification.

Terence Bowles, President and CEO of the SLSMC, indicated that the conclusion of the bargaining process would allow ships to continue transiting the waterway without interruption.

The Corporation was served with a 72-hour strike notice by the Canadian Auto Workers Union (CAW) at noon on Friday, September 30, of its intent to begin strike action on Monday, October 3, at noon.

If the tentative agreement had not been reached and the unionized workers had proceeded with strike action, The St. Lawrence Seaway would have been closed to all traffic.

According to a SLSMC press release, a contingency plan was in place to provide for the orderly shutdown of the system in the event of the labour interruption. 

Negotiations continued with a federally appointed mediator over the weekend in an effort to reach an agreement. The mediator had been working with the parties throughout the latest round of negotiations, which began on September 19.

The parties have been negotiating since May with the key issues being wages, healthcare (co-payment) and contracting.

The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation is a private, not-for-profit corporation, created pursuant to the Canada Marine Act, to operate and maintain the Canadian Seaway. 

Since its inception in 1959, over 2.5 billion tonnes of cargo valued in excess of $375 billion has been transported via the waterway. 

Today, over 60,000 Canadian jobs are directly or indirectly dependent upon cargo transiting the Seaway.

[…]

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Sports

Bantam Rep Lions shut out Rangers in exhibition action

October 5, 2011 Editor

The South Dundas “Pizza Hut” Novice B Lions kicked off the 2011/12 hockey season with back-to-back 5-4 and 4-2 wins against the South Stormont Selects.

Here on Thursday night, the Lions opened the season with a 5-4 win over the South Stormont Selects as they held on tightly to their one goal lead late in the third period. With their net emty, the Selects pressed to get the equalizer before the final buzzer but were turned away the Lions defense. 

Lions goaltender Brendan Shaver was tested in the last couple of minutes but stood his ground and kept the puck in front of the goal line.    

The Selects opened the scoring at the 3:30 minute mark of the first period and that score held with saves by goalies Keaton Woodside (Selects) and Brendan Shaver (Lions). 

With 1:04 left in the period, the Lions got on the board when Kayne McCadden grabbed the puck in the offensive zone and made a few moves around the Selects defenders before burying the puck behind Woodside. 

The Selects re-claimed the lead with 10 seconds left in the second when the Lion defence were caught up ice leaving Joshua Broad the lonely Lion to try and stop the Selects charge.     

Throughout the second and third period, the Lions offense carried the play as defenders Emytt Fetterly, Cassidy Bilmer and Spencer Barclay kept the play alive many times at the offensive blue line. 

At 6:26 the Selects took a 3-1 lead when a shot by Chase Duchesne squeaked a puck by Brendan Shaver. 

With the game closing in on only a few minutes left the Lions offense went to work. 

At 9:24 Joshua Broad passed the puck around a Select defender to Ben Lapier who went in on the Selects goalie and beat him glove side. At 11:23 Nolan Henry took a pass form Trent Rae at the Selects blue line and broke in on Woodside to beat him with another great shot. 

On the very next shift Ben Lapier went to work scoring two goals in eight seconds to record the first three goal performance of the year. Owen Fetterly picked up the lone assist on the goals.

In the rematch and resulting 4-2 win, Ben Lapier (from Kolby Latulippe) opened the scoring for the Lions on the power play with 19 seconds left in the first period. 

Early in the second, Lions goalie Brendan Shaver kept the Selects off the board with a huge glove save on a Selects shot from the slot. 

Owen Fetterly gave the Lions a 2-0 lead when he carried the puck down the right wing and wristed a shot just as he approached the slot.

The Selects finally got on the board when Owen Carter banged in his own rebound when he pounced on a loose puck by the Lions net. 

The Lions regained their two goal lead when Kayne McCadden got the puck from Latulippe in the right wing corner and flipped the puck over the goalie to Nolan Henry who was standing all alone in front of the net. 

To his surprise the puck landed flat on the ice, right on his stick. The puck bounced away, but Henry quickly regained control and shot the puck off the Selects goalie’s right pad into the net. 

Kayne McCadden scored with 1:31 left in the second period unassisted.

In the third period, Lions defenseman Spencer Barclay used his head (literally) in taking a scoring chance away from Selects Owen Carter. 

It started when Carter crossed over the Lions blue line, cut into the middle of the ice and let a wrist shot go. The puck hit Barclay on the helmet and deflected out of play. 

The South Dundas “Pizza Hut” Lions open their regular season to-night in Kemptville and travel to Westport on Saturday.

[…]

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News

Settlement area boundary study

October 5, 2011 Editor

A Comprehensive Settlement Area Boundary Study, which envelops all of the urban and rural areas within the county, was prepared by the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Planning Department.

The study is now available for public consumption and examination on the County website: www.sdgcounties.ca. The public is encouraged to give feedback on the study.

After reading the report, it appears that there are no changes proposed for Morrisburg’s urban settlement area.

The study does recommend minor changes for both Iroquois and Williamsburg.

According to the study summary, “no change to the boundaries is proposed for the Rural Settlement Areas of Ault Island, Dixon Corners, Glen Becker, Hainesville or Riverside Heights.”

“The area east of Elma is proposed to be added to the Rural Settlement Area.”

“Mariatown is recommended to be recognized as a Rural Settlement Area.”

Minor changes are suggested for Dunbar, Dundela, Irena, Winchester Springs, Glen Stewart, and Stampville.

[…]

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Opinion

Maud Street Paving

October 5, 2011 Editor

Although at the time of the Seaway re-construction of Morrisburg, the above paving job was being done on Park Avenue on November 12, 1957. Today, this is the west end of Maud Street. Note: the side walk is in and some of the mature trees of today have obviously not been planted.

 

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Opinion

A Time to be Thankful

October 5, 2011 Editor

It may be because my wife and I have been preparing for a Missions trip to Africa lately, and all the information we’ve been receiving about what we can expect to experience when we get there, but I have been really conscious lately of all the things I have to be thankful for.

Of course, this weekend is Thanksgiving and so it is timely to write about being thankful.

In my own life, I find that I do need to stop occasionally and reflect on the blessings of being in a country such as ours as well as taking the time to look around me and be grateful for family and friends.

Maybe you are not like me, but may I ask, when was the last time you turned on the tap at home and enjoyed a good clean drink of water? It’s easy for us to do that without even thinking about it. But, where we’re going in Africa, that is virtually impossible.

So, I’m thankful for clean water. I’m thankful for local government that sees to such things even though it may cost me more in taxes to enjoy that benefit.

While I’m at it, let me say I am thankful for my family. My wife is a great blessing to me as are my two sons and my daughter and their spouses. They have given me six grandchildren for which I am truly thankful. I realize that may be a bit personal, but I am thankful and we often don’t let them know.

I am thankful also for the church I pastor here in Morrisburg. I’m amazed at their love and care for each other and for people in general. I have been blessed to be with them over the past number of years.

Most of all, I’m thankful for the love of God. Ephesians 2:4-5 says, “But God is so rich in mercy and He loved us so much that even while we were dead because of our sins, He gave us life when He raised Christ from the dead”.

David the great songwriter penned the words, “It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord and to sing praises unto His name”.

Lloyd John Ogilvie, the wonderful Pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Hollywood, in his book God’s Best For My Life, says, “God’s grace, plus our gratitude, equals greatness. When we give God the glory, greatness grows in our character”.

There’s an old hymn written by Johnson Oatman Jr. back in 1897. The words of the refrain are these:

Count your blessings name them one by one,

Count your blessings see what God has done.

Count your blessings name them one by one

Count your many blessings see what God has done.

Maybe this is a good time to stop and consider all the things you have to be thankful for. Maybe because of some loss or tragedy in you life you think you have nothing to be thankful for. 

May I encourage you to take a few moments to look around. I expect you too will be surprised at all that God has blessed you with. Why not give Him thanks this glorious Thanksgiving season? Blessings to you all!

[…]

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Opinion

Stand up. Use your voice. Be heard.

October 5, 2011 Editor

The question most frequently asked to election candidates – in some form or another – is “What about me?”

Each and every person has their own story of how they’ve been affected (or more aptly, forgotten) by government and politics. Most often what I hear are people wondering why they have been overlooked by those people they helped vote into office in the first place. 

And, consequently, at election time people are often heard speculating on whether or not there’s even  a point to voting. Will it make a difference? Does this person care about me and my family? Will they work to ensure that I find a job? Will they work to ensure that I have a family doctor? Will they protect my children’s rights to a good education?

Basically, what we’re really asking is “Do I matter?” OR “Is my voice important?”

We, as members of a democratic society, elect fellow members – no better and no worse than we – who will represent us and our needs. I’ve said it before and I will say it again, it is really hard for one person to meet the needs of every single person, especially when many of those needs will inevitably clash.

However, the majority of people are the ones who aren’t heard. They’re the ones,  living in poverty, who seem invisible to government, to government officials, and oftentimes to neighbours. What about people on social assistance who want to work, but need help making that happen? What about people working minimum wage jobs who can’t afford to pay the rent or buy groceries? What about the single mom with three small children who is trying to work, take care of her children while maintaining her sanity, all on her own? 

There are so many people with so many stories from all backgrounds, culture, religions, age groups, and so on who need to be heard. Is it the responsibility of the elected representative to know what you – specifically you – need? Or is it your responsibility to come forward and ask for what you need?

Rather than sit back – complaining, moping and feeling victimized by the system – why not contact your representative, explain your situation, and ask for some help? Stand up. Use your voice. Be heard.

[…]

No Picture
Opinion

Around the Township.

October 5, 2011 Editor

Tomorrow, Thursday, October 6, we go to the polls to elect our provincial government. For some, it seems to have been an election that has garnered little interest…although some sources indicate it has been heating up in the last couple of days. Be sure to exercise your right to vote and choose the person you most feel will represent us the best. What is that term the kids use in their chats…oh yeah…lol. It stands for something like ‘laughing out loud’.

My gosh the days are getting shorter, aren’t they. Monday, the alarm went, and I was sure (completely and positively sure) something had gone wrong with the clock. In fact, with eyes still closed and curled up in the warmth of the comforter, I informed the hubby “there had to be something wrong with the clock.” It was still dark outside and there was no way it was time to get up. A quick trip to the kitchen to check the clock there finally convinced us. Why even the animals weren’t yet up and going, and for sure the cat is always ready for her breakfast as soon as the first alarm sounds. If we don’t move fast enough, she usually hits the bed and perches impatiently on a pillow above our heads until we do get going.

This weekend many of our young folks return home for Thanksgiving, (generally their first good meal since they left for school way back at the start of September) and for the graduation exercises  at ‘dear old’ Seaway High on Friday night.

That being said, it’s time to talk turkey. Roast turkey with all the fixings. Better yet, roast turkey with all the fixins and some pumpkin pie. Just a few thousand calories, but who’s counting. Following Thanksgiving, we have 74 days to work off a few pounds before the next big turkey time, with all the fixins, that takes place in late December. That’s right just 74 days until Christmas. Can you believe it?

That means we have to get going…squeeze in those last few games of golf, clear out the flower beds, put away the garden furniture, complete the fall house cleaning and re-hang the Christmas lights. And for some of us there is a lot of juggling as we are knee-deep in hockey and curling and all of our favourite winter activities.

Where does the time go. Any wonder we don’t believe the alarm clock when it sounds off to tell us it is time to get up. lol…..

[…]

No Picture
Sports

Novice B Lions open pre-season with wins

October 5, 2011 Editor

The South Dundas “Pizza Hut” Novice B Lions kicked off the 2011/12 hockey season with back-to-back 5-4 and 4-2 wins against the South Stormont Selects.

Here on Thursday night, the Lions opened the season with a 5-4 win over the South Stormont Selects as they held on tightly to their one goal lead late in the third period. With their net emty, the Selects pressed to get the equalizer before the final buzzer but were turned away the Lions defense. 

Lions goaltender Brendan Shaver was tested in the last couple of minutes but stood his ground and kept the puck in front of the goal line.    

The Selects opened the scoring at the 3:30 minute mark of the first period and that score held with saves by goalies Keaton Woodside (Selects) and Brendan Shaver (Lions). 

With 1:04 left in the period, the Lions got on the board when Kayne McCadden grabbed the puck in the offensive zone and made a few moves around the Selects defenders before burying the puck behind Woodside. 

The Selects re-claimed the lead with 10 seconds left in the second when the Lion defence were caught up ice leaving Joshua Broad the lonely Lion to try and stop the Selects charge.     

Throughout the second and third period, the Lions offense carried the play as defenders Emytt Fetterly, Cassidy Bilmer and Spencer Barclay kept the play alive many times at the offensive blue line. 

At 6:26 the Selects took a 3-1 lead when a shot by Chase Duchesne squeaked a puck by Brendan Shaver. 

With the game closing in on only a few minutes left the Lions offense went to work. 

At 9:24 Joshua Broad passed the puck around a Select defender to Ben Lapier who went in on the Selects goalie and beat him glove side. At 11:23 Nolan Henry took a pass form Trent Rae at the Selects blue line and broke in on Woodside to beat him with another great shot. 

On the very next shift Ben Lapier went to work scoring two goals in eight seconds to record the first three goal performance of the year. Owen Fetterly picked up the lone assist on the goals.

In the rematch and resulting 4-2 win, Ben Lapier (from Kolby Latulippe) opened the scoring for the Lions on the power play with 19 seconds left in the first period. 

Early in the second, Lions goalie Brendan Shaver kept the Selects off the board with a huge glove save on a Selects shot from the slot. 

Owen Fetterly gave the Lions a 2-0 lead when he carried the puck down the right wing and wristed a shot just as he approached the slot.

The Selects finally got on the board when Owen Carter banged in his own rebound when he pounced on a loose puck by the Lions net. 

The Lions regained their two goal lead when Kayne McCadden got the puck from Latulippe in the right wing corner and flipped the puck over the goalie to Nolan Henry who was standing all alone in front of the net. 

To his surprise the puck landed flat on the ice, right on his stick. The puck bounced away, but Henry quickly regained control and shot the puck off the Selects goalie’s right pad into the net. 

Kayne McCadden scored with 1:31 left in the second period unassisted.

In the third period, Lions defenseman Spencer Barclay used his head (literally) in taking a scoring chance away from Selects Owen Carter. 

It started when Carter crossed over the Lions blue line, cut into the middle of the ice and let a wrist shot go. The puck hit Barclay on the helmet and deflected out of play. 

The South Dundas “Pizza Hut” Lions open their regular season to-night in Kemptville and travel to Westport on Saturday.

[…]

No Picture
News

Celebrating nature and wildlife

October 5, 2011 Editor

Upper Canada Migratory Bird Sanctuary’s Nature & Wildlife Day on October 2nd.

The yearly event, hosted by the Friends of the Sanctuary, offered an array of informative, educational and entertaining  options.

Little Ray’s Reptile Zoo brought a few residents from their home in Ottawa. The lucky reptiles and amphibians in attendance were able to enjoy the warmth of being inside the Interpretive Centre.

Outside, despite the cold and mist, everyone seemed to enjoy the various exhibits.

“The Roasting Man” filled the autumn air with the delicious smell of summertime barbecue.

Under the shelter of tents, visitors could browse the tables filled with various items for the silent auction, arts and crafts, baking, and used books. They could also try their luck with some raffles. 

Visitors were given the opportunity to build a birdhouse or sift through samples of water for various bugs and other living things.

The Raisin Region Conservation Authority and the South Nation Conservation (SNC) were in attendance to answer questions. 

In fact, the SNC was also hoping for some votes. They were recently “awarded $10,000 in funding from the SHELL Environmental Fund.” By voting online for SNC, the $10,000 could turn into $25,000. Shell will choose the top eight programs. If interested in voting, the link is http://fuellingchange.com/#org-list where South Nation is listed in the project profiles.

The Canadian Carp Club was also available with their freshly caught carp. For those who were curious, “petting” the carp or more precisely “toughing” the carp was also possible. The club was there to bring awareness to the “sport” of carp fishing. It was pointed out that the majority of all carp caught are again returned to their habitats, including the visitors to Nature & Wildlife Day.

For those looking to pet wildlife with fur, there were a number of opportunities. The Monalea Petting Zoo’s llamas and goats were more than eager to say hello. Also there were rabbits and ducks.

The Muskoka Wildlife Centre’s demonstration included an introduction to a skunk, a grey fox, an opposum, a porcupine, and a groundhog. For those who wished, the groundhog welcomed a friendly pat.

Falcon Environmental Services provided the airborne wildlife who couldn’t be touched, but could definitely be admired and appreciated.  Among the guests present were the Harris Hawk, the Peregrine Falcon, the  American Kestral, the Barn Owl, and the Great Horned Owl.

The proceeds from the event will “assist in the promotion of educational, resource management, recreational and interpretive programs at the Sanctuary.”

The free-to-use walking trails are open year round.

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News

High School development leaves Helping Hand mission ‘homeless’

October 5, 2011 Editor

The final notice has been received and the Helping Hand, a mission of the Pentecostal Church, has until October 17th to vacate its location in the old Morrisburg High School, where it has been a source of clothing for those in need for the past 11 years.

Unfortunate, but true, the Helping Hand used clothing depot, answers a very big need in South Dundas and the surrounding area with an average of 2000-2,500 visitors benefiting from it each year.

The fact that the Helping Hand has to vacate is not a surprise as they were put on notice way back in 2009, that they were in their location on a monthly basis. With the upcoming renovation to the historic high school building to house an expansion to the St. Lawrence Medical and the South Dundas Municipal offices, the monthly basis has ended and the Helping Hand is closing.

The problem is that since they were put on notice of the eventual loss of their location they have been unable to find a new location that would be rent-free, or at the very least, very cheap.

“We have a lot of people not happy about it,” says Pentecostal minister, Rev. Duncan Perry.  “But we can’t afford to go somewhere else. We have a couple thousand dollars (donations) a year coming in, but that is not enough to rent.”

“We don’t want to locate in the mall, and the only other building in town is the former St. Lawrence Parks building.”

According to Rev. Perry, that building is in such poor shape it is no longer an option, and he understands the Food Bank will replace the County Library in its lower level arena location should the library move to the high school, once renovated.

“I was really hoping they (municipality) would give us half of the bottom of the arena,” says Rev. Perry. “But I understand that it is going to the arena staff for a workshop/storage. It would have been a perfect fit for us.”

“We’ve been open for 11 years, and we are averaging 2,000 to 2,500 people a year. The $2,000 we receive in donations (goodwill donations from those who benefit from the Helping Hand, and donations from the community) is put back into the community.”

Recently, money was donated to the Breakfast Programs at Seaway High and Morrisburg Public Schools. “We’ve also given a lot to the Food Bank over the years.”

“People have come to us and told us that if we weren’t (Helping Hand) here, they didn’t know what they would do. The clothing donated to us is top notch and we made a decision at the start, that if we wouldn’t wear it, it wouldn’t be used.”

“One lady has been using it over and over through the years to clothe her children.”

“Those are the kind of stories we hear every week.”

“It is really amazing what we have done locally, and we’ve sent truckloads of clothes overseas when we couldn’t handle it all.”

The Helping Hand is run by volunteers and there is no charge for the clothing, although visitors can make goodwill donations.

“We have helped people from all over. We wish we could keep it open, we really do. It’s too bad, and I understand the town doesn’t have the money for a building.”

“I do believe the number of working poor is getting larger. It’s unfortunate we need a place like this but we do. If there was a place found, we wouldn’t even think about shutting it down. If they would reconsider letting us share with the Food Bank that would be ideal.”

That, however, according to Rev. Perry, is not an option at this time, and the Helping Hand is preparing to close by the October 17 deadline. Arrangements have been made for representatives from Agape in Cornwall to visit the facility, with the hope that they will be able to take the clothing.

Located at 40, Fifth Street West in Cornwall, the Agape Centre runs a Food Bank, Soup Kitchen and Thrift Shoppe.

South Dundas mayor Steven Byvelds says he is appreciative of the service the Helping Hand provides to the community. “It’s unfortunate, but hopefully they will find somewhere in the community.”

Byvelds confirmed that the long-term plan is for removal of the former Parks building. “That building is done, and we are only spending what we have to, to keep it going.”

He says there has been some discussion of moving the Food Bank to the arena location, but the discussions are very preliminary and nothing is decided and nothing can or will be decided until the final plans are in place for the high school.

Those plans, are for the St. Lawrence Medical Clinic to occupy the first floor (ground level) and the municipal offices to occupy some or all (if necessary) of the second floor. Once these two entities are accommodated then the remaining space, including the third floor, will be considered.

[…]