Hike for Hospice brings in $9,000 locally

Iroquois-Matilda Lions support Hospice Hike – Iroquois-Matilda Lion Evonne Delegarde, far right, delivered a cheque for $2,500 to Paul Renaud, chair of the board of the Dundas County Hospice (third from right) at the start of the 2018 Hike for Hospice, held at J.C. Whitteker Park on Sunday, May 6. Also taking part in the presentation were (l-r) Lynn Gee, program assistant, Linda Johnson, director of client and volunteer services, Lisa Casselman, executive director of the Hospice, MPP Jim McDonell, Ross Bennett, member of the fundraising committee and Sandra Jennings, chair of the fundraising committee. (The Leader/Gibb photo)

WILLIAMSBURG – “We feel very blessed to be part of this wonderful community,” said Lisa Casselman, executive director of the Dundas County Hospice. “Community support is essential to guarantee the services we offer to palliative patients and to their families.

The Dundas County Hospice is a vital part of our community.”

On Sunday, May 6, 2018, members of the community, service groups, and business sponsors showed their support by helping Hike organizers to raise $9,000 for the Hospice.

Runners and walkers gathered at J.C. Whitteker Park in Williamsburg, many bringing pledge sheets with them, to join in the 2.5 kilometre hike around Williamsburg (the route avoided busy roads). Matraca Villeneuve of Waterfront Fitness was on hand to help the participants to warm up and loosen up, before Piper Hugh Metcalfe of Inkerman led the group on the first leg of the walk.

Lion Evonne Delegarde presented a cheque for $2,500 to Paul Renaud, chair of the board of the Dundas County Hospice, on behalf of the Iroquois-Matilda Lions club.
Board chair Renaud welcomed everyone to the fundraiser. “We are very excited to see all these people out here today. I want to thank everyone who contributed in any way to our Hospice Hike success.”

Lisa Casselman pointed out that the May 7 event was part of a National Day organized by the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association. “However, all the funds we raise stay locally,” she said, “and go to support the Dundas County Hospice, particularly our programs.”

The Dundas Hospice must raise 45 per cent of its operating budget annually to run its programs.

“We work with palliative patients and their families providing care giver support, equipment loans, a volunteer visiting program and grief and bereavement support. Our goal is to raise funds but also awareness about palliative care,” she said.