New pipeline to start at Iroquois

Iroquois is on the cusp of 1,400 km of new pipeline that will be constructed to carry oil eastward.

TransCanada Pipelines is converting 3,000 km of an existing natural gas pipeline that runs across Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Eastern Ontario into an oil pipeline. 

That gas pipeline runs through South Dundas.

The proposed conversion ends at the Iroquois pumping station, and from that point on, the new construction starts.

The purpose of the project is to move oil from Alberta to Quebec and New Brunswick, including marine facilities for shipping exports to other markets.

TransCanada’s Energy East project will carry 500,000 to 850,000 barrels per day of crude oil from Alberta and Saskatchewan to refineries in Eastern Canada.

Enbridge, which has existing oil pipelines that run through South Dundas, is also in the process of a project that will carry 300,000 barrels a day from west to east. Their project is a flow reversal rather than a conversion and is not a new build. Inspection work for the Enbridge flow reversal project is taking place locally later this summer. 

Application for approval of this TransCanada conversion and new build project will be filed late this year with the National Energy Board decision and final approval expected in 2015.

Pipelines operate with a 99.99 per cent safety record in Canada, which is significantly lower that railway and truck transportation of oil.

Presently, 75 per cent of oil refined in Eastern Canada is imported from overseas. Projects like these will bring more Canadian oil to consumers.